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Fix Your Deadlift Today!

Fix Your Deadlift Today!

The deadlift is getting more and more popular everyday…

 

Between “booty workouts”, CrossFit, increased interest in powerlifting, and resistance training becoming more accepted, exercises like squats and deadlifts are no longer just for hardcore gym rats. And that’s a good thing!

While a world where everyone deadlifts sounds awesome, resistance training has so many benefits that everyone should participate in some way. Yes, you can benefit even if your goal isn’t getting bigger, stronger, or faster.

Regardless of age or gender, everyone should be able to and needs to know how to lift something from the floor. This is what the deadlift is all about. Personally, I believe our standards for fitness are long overdue for an update and the deadlift should be included. That’s a long conversation for another day though. If you’re going to include this exercise in your fitness program (and you should, in some way!), make sure you’re doing it right.

Below is a list of the most common mistakes I see when people are first learning to deadlift. There’s a video demonstrating “right” vs “wrong” technique, and some pointers to help you get it right.

 

Quick Tips to Fix Your Deadlift Technique

 

Starting by extending the knees first

For anyone that trains to be healthy, reduce injury and feel better during day to day activities, make sure you learn this if you get nothing else from your time in the gym!

Lifting something from the floor by extending the knees first puts you in a disadvantaged position. Because your legs are now straight, you have to lift with your lower back muscles. This usually leads to an injury or a whole lot of unnecessary soreness.

Instead of straightening your knees then lifting the bar, work on getting your hips and shoulders to rise at the same time. You could call this “standing with the bar”.

This is the main reason I teach everyone that comes to my gym how to deadlift. It isn’t always about lifting heavy weights (Bravo if you’re looking to do that!). Learning how to properly lift something from the floor to a standing position is the end goal. One way or another this is something you’ll need to do at some point. Better to be prepared than sorry I say.

Pulling with your arms

This tends to happen when using something other than a straight bar or if the resistance is light. Yes, your upper body is involved in the movement, but a common mistake is to finish the top half by pulling with the arms. Think of your hands as hooks, as they are there only to hold the bar. Instead, keep your lats engaged and finish the movement by bringing your hips to the bar, kettlebell, or whatever you’re using for resistance.

 

Hyperextending or “leaning back”

Save your lumbar spine! The exercise stops when you are tall, so there’s not really any benefit to this. Again, finish by bringing your hips to meet the bar. Imagine there is a wall behind you, and stop when your upper back touches it.

 

Rolling shoulders back to finish

Once you set yourself to lift the bar, the position of your body shouldn’t change other than raising and lowering the bar from the floor. You can avoid this shoulder roll and shrug by “turning on” your lats before you start. Imagine putting your shoulders into your back pocket. If you have trouble or don’t know how to do this, read this.

 

Starting too close or too far from the bar

Start too far from the bar and you’ll be in a less than ideal position to safely perform the lift and find yourself off balance. Start too close and you can say goodbye to the skin on your shins! Best position is with the bar roughly over the middle of your foot but not touching your shins.

 

 

Squatting or letting the bar ride your thighs

A deadlift is not a squat. The main difference between the exercises, other than the position of the bar, is the hip hinge involved with the deadlift. This hinge gives the bar a straight path to the floor and makes the movement hip dominant. To fix this, push your hips back as you descend instead of “sitting” first. Improving abdominal strength, hip and ankle mobility will help too.

 

Whether it’s a bar loaded with 400 pounds, a sleeping child, a box, or groceries, learning to do it right will keep you strong and healthy for a long time to come. Use these tips to perfect your technique and enjoy the benefits of improved strength.