40 Main Street, 2nd Floor. Madison, NJ. (201) 779-0412

resistance training // Category

Category based archive
03 May

The deadlift is getting more and more popular everyday…

 

Between “booty workouts”, CrossFit, increased interest in powerlifting, and resistance training becoming more accepted, exercises like squats and deadlifts are no longer just for hardcore gym rats. And that’s a good thing!

While a world where everyone deadlifts sounds awesome, resistance training has so many benefits that everyone should participate in some way. Yes, you can benefit even if your goal isn’t getting bigger, stronger, or faster.

Regardless of age or gender, everyone should be able to and needs to know how to lift something from the floor. This is what the deadlift is all about. Personally, I believe our standards for fitness are long overdue for an update and the deadlift should be included. That’s a long conversation for another day though. If you’re going to include this exercise in your fitness program (and you should, in some way!), make sure you’re doing it right.

Below is a list of the most common mistakes I see when people are first learning to deadlift. There’s a video demonstrating “right” vs “wrong” technique, and some pointers to help you get it right.

 

Quick Tips to Fix Your Deadlift Technique

 

Starting by extending the knees first

For anyone that trains to be healthy, reduce injury and feel better during day to day activities, make sure you learn this if you get nothing else from your time in the gym!

Lifting something from the floor by extending the knees first puts you in a disadvantaged position. Because your legs are now straight, you have to lift with your lower back muscles. This usually leads to an injury or a whole lot of unnecessary soreness.

Instead of straightening your knees then lifting the bar, work on getting your hips and shoulders to rise at the same time. You could call this “standing with the bar”.

This is the main reason I teach everyone that comes to my gym how to deadlift. It isn’t always about lifting heavy weights (Bravo if you’re looking to do that!). Learning how to properly lift something from the floor to a standing position is the end goal. One way or another this is something you’ll need to do at some point. Better to be prepared than sorry I say.

Pulling with your arms

This tends to happen when using something other than a straight bar or if the resistance is light. Yes, your upper body is involved in the movement, but a common mistake is to finish the top half by pulling with the arms. Think of your hands as hooks, as they are there only to hold the bar. Instead, keep your lats engaged and finish the movement by bringing your hips to the bar, kettlebell, or whatever you’re using for resistance.

 

Hyperextending or “leaning back”

Save your lumbar spine! The exercise stops when you are tall, so there’s not really any benefit to this. Again, finish by bringing your hips to meet the bar. Imagine there is a wall behind you, and stop when your upper back touches it.

 

Rolling shoulders back to finish

Once you set yourself to lift the bar, the position of your body shouldn’t change other than raising and lowering the bar from the floor. You can avoid this shoulder roll and shrug by “turning on” your lats before you start. Imagine putting your shoulders into your back pocket. If you have trouble or don’t know how to do this, read this.

 

Starting too close or too far from the bar

Start too far from the bar and you’ll be in a less than ideal position to safely perform the lift and find yourself off balance. Start too close and you can say goodbye to the skin on your shins! Best position is with the bar roughly over the middle of your foot but not touching your shins.

 

 

Squatting or letting the bar ride your thighs

A deadlift is not a squat. The main difference between the exercises, other than the position of the bar, is the hip hinge involved with the deadlift. This hinge gives the bar a straight path to the floor and makes the movement hip dominant. To fix this, push your hips back as you descend instead of “sitting” first. Improving abdominal strength, hip and ankle mobility will help too.

 

Whether it’s a bar loaded with 400 pounds, a sleeping child, a box, or groceries, learning to do it right will keep you strong and healthy for a long time to come. Use these tips to perfect your technique and enjoy the benefits of improved strength.

10 Apr

Fitness. Exercise. Working out. Training. Whatever you call it, it is a tool that can significantly improve your life in many ways! Improved strength, appearance, health, confidence, and more.

Much like a hammer, a saw, or a wrench, you must learn to use your tools first. This learning process means a lot of bent nails, ruined wood, stripped bolt heads, and a fair amount of swearing and frustration. Maybe a few band aids as well. Nothing wrong with that, mistakes are part of the learning process. In fitness, this would probably mean missed workouts, falling off your food plan, or possibly an injury from overdoing it in the gym. Again, this is how we learn what works and what doesn’t.

Learning to use a hammer means bending some nails

As you gain experience with these tools, your ability to use them also improves. The hammer requires less effort to swing. Your cuts with the saw become more precise. Getting to the gym regularly doesn’t require as much thought and planning. Food prep is easier, and your squat technique is starting to feel more natural. This means you are improving!

Over time you may learn that your needs require an upgraded set of tools. A few screwdrivers were enough before, but now an electric drill is a necessity. The training plan you started with to lose 20 pounds worked great, but your new goal of finishing a marathon or entering a powerlifting competition requires a more advanced program.

Keep your “fitness tools” in good condition. Find the most effective ways to use them and regularly add new tools to the box so you can easily complete any “project” that comes your way.

31 Aug

For many, the feeling of soreness after a workout can provide a sense of accomplishment, making you feel like you really pushed yourself. While the feeling may be enjoyable, soreness is not an indicator of  progress or the effectiveness of a workout.

What is soreness?

Soreness comes from damage to muscle tissue caused by stress and overload. To put it another way, do more than your body is currently used to and you’ll end up sore. A long walk after a few weeks without exercise can cause muscle soreness, but few would call that a good workout.

This may sound bad, but it can be a good thing! Overloading the body is important for making progress, and at some point you have to push beyond your current ability level. The other side to this overload picture is adaptation, which is what happens when the body “catches up” and gets used to what you are asking of it.

For a better understanding of this “overload and adaptation” thing, let’s take a look at something called General Adaptation Syndrome.

General Adaptation Syndrome, a 3 stage set of physiological processes, was discovered by scientist and physician Hans Selye in 1926[1]. This set of processes prepare the body for danger and increase the chances of survival.

Selye identified 3 predictable stages that the body uses as a response to stress:

  • Alarm Stage. A burst of energy is provided. Adrenaline and cortisol are released, preparing for the “fight or flight” response.
  • Resistance Stage. The body attempts to resist or adapt.
  • Exhaustion Stage. The body fails to adapt to the stressful stimulus and will gradually deteriorate over time

 

What does all of this mean?

If you are constantly chasing soreness in your workouts, you are not allowing your body time to adapt. As stated above, if the body does not adapt it will deteriorate over time. At best, this will limit your progress in the gym. At worst, you’ll end up sick, injured and unable to train.

 

Here are better ways to measure the effectiveness of your workouts:

  • More weight for an exercise
  • Less rest needed between sets or to complete a session
  • More sets of an exercise
  • More reps performed at a given weight for an exercise
  • For athletes, a noticeable transfer of power, speed, or endurance to your sport.
  • For the rest of us, an easier time with everyday tasks (stairs, carrying bags, yard work, etc)

 

Remember, soreness isn’t the goal. Progress is. Train hard AND train smart!

 

References

[1]How Your Body Copes With And Adapts To Stress With General Adaptation Syndrome.” General Adaptation Syndrome. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Aug. 2016.

23 Aug

“I don’t want to get bulky. Lifting weights makes you big, and I don’t want to look like a man.”

This myth is repeated far more often than it should be. A quick look at any social media platform shows you this just isn’t true! If you are seriously concerned about building too much muscle or having an undesirable physique, worry no more.  With a little information, we can hopefully put this thing to rest once and for all.

These are my answers to the two most common questions I get from people with concerns about resistance training.

1 – Can a resistance training program make me bigger? Yes, but this is not a guarantee. While many start lifting with the intent to get bigger, there are three very important things to keep in mind:

1) A caloric surplus causes weight gain. Building muscle, and gaining weight in general, requires you to eat more. The quality and quantity of your nutrition affects your appearance and physical performance. Don’t want to get bigger? Keep your nutrition in check. Honestly, it is that simple.

2) There are ways to train without putting on size. Nutrition aside, there are other factors that go into a resistance training program – frequency (number of training sessions per week), training volume (amount of work per session), and training intensity (percentage of your maximum capacity).  All of these factors can be adjusted to improve fitness, speed, power, strength and conditioning WITHOUT putting on size. This approach is used by weight class athletes like boxers, martial artists, wrestlers, and others that need the benefits of strength training without gaining additional weight.

Yes, you can get stronger without getting bigger!

Yes, you can lift, get stronger and get leaner without getting bigger!

3) Women are at a disadvantage when it comes to building muscle. Testosterone, the primary muscle building hormone, is less present in women than men. This doesn’t mean women cannot build muscle, it just requires more work. Which takes us to question number two…

2 – Can you get “big and bulky” casually training  a few times week? If only it were that easy! Unless you’re blessed with perfect weight room genes, nope. Even under the most ideal conditions, it takes A LOT of work. Gaining serious muscle takes hours upon hours of training, precise and often restricted nutrition, a schedule built around exercise, and anabolic steroids in many cases. A few hours a week in the gym isn’t enough to make this a possibility.

For women afraid of “looking like a man” or “getting bigger”,  you can lift, get stronger, get leaner, and enjoy the many benefits of resistance training with no worry of this outdated myth based on false assumptions.